You Sound Tired!

We all have days when we drag ourselves out of bed and seem to sleepwalk through the day.  I am no longer able to pull “all-nighters” common in my college days, though having children has been a long-term commitment to sleep deprivation!  I know very well what my “tired voice” feels like:  It is rough, breathy and quiet.  I don’t breathe as deeply or project my sound. 

Researchers have been looking into the effects of fatigue on voice and speech in an interesting study.  Read an article about this study or view the abstract from the scholarly publication.  Participants were required to stay awake for 24 hours and were periodically recorded completing speech tasks such as counting, reading, and sustaining vowels.  The researchers measured speech rate, pause length, data relating to variation in quality, and other speech and voice elements.  They found that as time went on, the participants’ speech rates slowed, pauses got longer, and quality variation increased.  An explanation offered by one of the researchers, Dr. Adam Vogel,  is that we lose control of speech and voice muscles as we become more tired.

If today is one of those days for you, a great way to warm-up your voice is with the lip trill.  Also called the “raspberry”, the lip trill takes the pressure off of your vocal folds and allows you to efficiently connect your breath to your sound while exploring pitch freely.  I have a client who has always hated her voice, especially in the morning.  It used to take her several hours to “wake up” vocally.  This exercise helps her quickly and gently wake her “morning voice”.  What works for you?

Abstract citation:

Acoustic analysis of the effects of sustained wakefulness on speech
J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128, 3747 (2010)
http://link.aip.org/link/?JASMAN/128/3747/1

Posted on 28 February 2011 | Category: General, Presentation, Singing, speaking, Voice

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World Voice Day

Today is World Voice Day! Celebrate your voice, which is a powerful tool for delivering messages, an infinitely expressive instrument to convey your emotions, and a canvas for vocal artists to create beauty and evoke reactions.  Whose voices do you admire? Who has had an effect on you by using their voice to say words you needed to hear? Today is the day to honor those people in your hearts and minds, and if you wish, here. I invite you to post a comment, tell a story, or share your list of people whose voices you really like.

Learn more about World Voice Day, including its history and purpose, and link to exercises and information about the voice.  Click here, and turn on your speakers to hear the word “voice” spoken in many of the world’s languages.

Posted on 16 April 2009 | Category: Communication, General, Presentation, Singing, Voice

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A Call for Questions

I would love to use this blog as a place to answer any questions related to communication.  If I can’t answer them, I will do my best to find the answer and invite feedback from you.  So go ahead, ask away!  Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • VOICE:  Would you like to know something about how your voice works?  What people prefer to hear in a voice?  Voices people dislike?  Can a voice be changed?
  • ACCENT:  Perhaps you want to know something about accents, like what is the American accent?  Why are some accents harder to understand than others?  Is it discriminatory to require an employee to receive accent modification training?
  • PRESENTATION:  How about presentation in the business world?  How much should a person use gestures?  Should a presentation incorporate visual aids like PowerPoint?

These are just a few ideas.  Use them or brainstorm your own and ask.  I love this stuff!

Posted on 1 April 2009 | Category: Accent, Communication, Presentation, Voice

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Accent Modification – A Racist Goal?

One of the services we provide at The Sound Center is accent modification for foreign and regional accents.  Clients work on pronunciation, intonation, speaking rate, style of presentation, and tone of voice, among other areas.  The accent we teach is American English, as spoken by most broadcasters in the US.

Some see this work as fundamentally racist.  They claim that the group in power dictates the correct way of speaking, and the less powerful are forced to change.  Who has the right to say which way of speaking is correct?

I can see their point, especially when people are dismissed or demeaned for the way they speak.  However, in my opinion, communication is the goal.  If people have ideas to share but their audience cannot understand them, it is to their benefit to make some changes in the way they speak.

I have simplified this debate considerably, but I am curious to find out what you think.  Is accent modification a racist goal?

Posted on 10 March 2009 | Category: Accent, Communication, Presentation, Voice

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